Head Start Benefits Kids Who Attend — And Their Kids, Too

A new study shows that the children of people who had access to Head Start are more likely to graduate high school and attend college, and less likely to commit crime and become a teen parent, according to Chalkbeat.

“Our findings indicate that societal investments in early childhood education can disrupt the intergenerational transmission of the effects of poverty,” write researchers Andrew Barr of Texas A&M and Chloe Gibbs of Notre Dame.

Chalkbeat reports:

The study finds that disadvantaged women who had access to Head Start seemed to benefit from the program in ways that helped their children down the line. Because of the program, crime in the second generation fell by 15 percentage points and high school graduation increased by 12 percentage points. Rates of teen parenthood dropped by nearly 9 percentage points and rates of college attendance rose by 17 percentage points.

FFYF’s 2017 national poll found that 84% of voters support providing greater funding to programs like Head Start, which provides quality early education, nutrition, and support services to children. That includes 73% of Trump voters, and 96% of Clinton voters.

Read more about the study.